Neuroimaging Studies Do Not Prove the Existence of Brain Abnormalities in Spastic (Spasmodic) Dysphonia Adductor spastic (spasmodic) dysphonia is an extremely serious voice disorder that can produce occupational dislocation, family disruption, social withdrawal, depression, and contemplation of suicide. Technically, spastic dysphonia is not a single entity, but is a family of disorders that can result from different causes and can cross many professional boundaries, ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   August 01, 1991
Neuroimaging Studies Do Not Prove the Existence of Brain Abnormalities in Spastic (Spasmodic) Dysphonia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Arnold E. Aronson
    Section of Speech Pathology Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation Rochester, MN
  • Terrence D. Lagerlund
    Neurophysiology Laboratory Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation Rochester, MN
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Arnold E. Aronson, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905.
Article Information
Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   August 01, 1991
Neuroimaging Studies Do Not Prove the Existence of Brain Abnormalities in Spastic (Spasmodic) Dysphonia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 801-805. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.801
History: Received May 14, 1990 , Accepted August 16, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 801-805. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.801
History: Received May 14, 1990; Accepted August 16, 1990
Acknowledgments
We thank the following members of the Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation for their advice and opinions in the preparation of this response: Gregory D. Cascino, Richard J. Caselli, Emre Kokmen, Ronald C. Petersen, and T. Yanagihara, Department of Neurology; and Clifford R. Jack, Jr., Section of Neuroradiology.
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