Frequency Response of the Fourcin Electroglottograph and Measurement of Temporal Aspects of Laryngeal Movement During Swallowing The purpose of this investigation was to study the frequency response of a modified Fourcin EGG at frequencies associated with the slow varying laryngeal movement of swallowing and to compare those findings with the response characteristics of the EGG at frequencies associated with phonation. Frequency-dependent differences were found. At very ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 1991
Frequency Response of the Fourcin Electroglottograph and Measurement of Temporal Aspects of Laryngeal Movement During Swallowing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Adrienne L. Perlman
    Audiology/Speech Pathology Service VA Medical Center Iowa City
  • Haixiang Liang
    Department of Electrical Engineerng University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Adrienne L. Perlman, Audiology/Speech Pathology Service, VA Medical Center, Iowa City, IA 52240.
Article Information
Speech / Research Notes
Research Note   |   August 01, 1991
Frequency Response of the Fourcin Electroglottograph and Measurement of Temporal Aspects of Laryngeal Movement During Swallowing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 791-795. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.791
History: Received January 12, 1990 , Accepted August 31, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 791-795. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.791
History: Received January 12, 1990; Accepted August 31, 1990

The purpose of this investigation was to study the frequency response of a modified Fourcin EGG at frequencies associated with the slow varying laryngeal movement of swallowing and to compare those findings with the response characteristics of the EGG at frequencies associated with phonation. Frequency-dependent differences were found. At very low frequencies the EGG output was found to be the derivative of the changes in neck impedance; at higher frequencies the EGG output directly represented the changes in neck impedance. Three of the four phases of the pharyngeal stage of the swallow are represented by the EGG signal.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank Professor Ingo Titze for his comments; David Druker, research technician to Dr. Titze, for his assistance in the early stages of this research; and Professor Adrian Fourcin for his kind assistance.
This research was supported by VA Rehabilitation Research and Development funds.
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