Respiratory Kinematics in Speakers with Cerebellar Disease The respiratory abilities of a group of 12 speech disordered subjects with cerebellar disease were assessed using both spirometric and kinematic techniques and compared to those of a group of 12 non-neurologically impaired controls matched for age and gender. Results of the spirometric assessment showed that although all of the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1991
Respiratory Kinematics in Speakers with Cerebellar Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bruce E. Murdoch
    The University of Queensland
  • Helen J. Chenery
    The University of Queensland
  • Peter D. Stokes
    The University of Queensland
  • William J. Hardcastle
    Department of Linguistic Science University of Reading
  • Request for reprints should be sent to Bruce E. Murdoch, University of Queensland, Dept. of Speech and Hearing, 6 Rock Street, St. Lucia, Queensland, Australia 4067.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1991
Respiratory Kinematics in Speakers with Cerebellar Disease
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 768-780. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.768
History: Received May 21, 1990 , Accepted November 19, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 768-780. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.768
History: Received May 21, 1990; Accepted November 19, 1990

The respiratory abilities of a group of 12 speech disordered subjects with cerebellar disease were assessed using both spirometric and kinematic techniques and compared to those of a group of 12 non-neurologically impaired controls matched for age and gender. Results of the spirometric assessment showed that although all of the cerebellar-diseased subjects had normal total lung capacities, almost half had vital capacities below normal limits. All except 1 of the cerebellar-diseased subjects exhibited irregularities in their chest wall movements while performing sustained vowel and syllable repetition tasks. Over half of the cerebellar-diseased subjects also displayed similar rregularities when reading and conversing. The same irregularities were not present in the chest wall movements exhibited by the control subjects suggesting that their presence was caused by the cerebellar disease Results are discussed in terms of the effects of cerebellar disease on neuromuscular function.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank Gordon Williams, Respiratory Technician, Mater Hospital, Brisbane, for his assistance in conducting the Spirometric assessments. The help and cooperation of the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Queensland in obtaining suitable subjects is gratefully acknowledged. This research was supported by a grant (No. A58716277) from the Australian Research Council.
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