Respiratory and Laryngeal Function During Whispering Established procedures for making chest wall kinematic observations (Hoit & Hixon, 1987) and pressure-flow observations (Smitheran & Hixon, 1981) were used to study respiratory and laryngeal function during whispering and speaking in 10 healthy young adults. Results indicate that whispering involves generally lower lung volumes, lower tracheal pressures, higher translaryngeal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1991
Respiratory and Laryngeal Function During Whispering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elaine T. Stathopoulos
    University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders Tucson
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders Tucson
  • Thomas J. Hixon
    University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders Tucson
  • Peter J. Watson
    University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders Tucson
  • Nancy Pearl Solomon
    University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders Tucson
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Elaine T. Stathopoulous, CDS, Park Hall, Rm. 109, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260.
  • Presently affiliated with State University of New York at Buffalo.
    Presently affiliated with State University of New York at Buffalo.×
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1991
Respiratory and Laryngeal Function During Whispering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 761-767. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.761
History: Received January 19, 1990 , Accepted November 1, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 761-767. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.761
History: Received January 19, 1990; Accepted November 1, 1990

Established procedures for making chest wall kinematic observations (Hoit & Hixon, 1987) and pressure-flow observations (Smitheran & Hixon, 1981) were used to study respiratory and laryngeal function during whispering and speaking in 10 healthy young adults. Results indicate that whispering involves generally lower lung volumes, lower tracheal pressures, higher translaryngeal flows, lower laryngeal airway resistances, and fewer syllables per breath group when compared to speaking. The use of lower lung volumes during whispering than speaking may reflect a means of achieving different tracheal pressure targets. Reductions in the number of syllables produced per breath group may be an adjustment to the high rate of air expenditure accompanying whispering compared to speaking. Performance of the normal subjects studied in this investigation does not resemble that of individuals with speech and voice disorders characterized by low resistive loads.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by the following grants from the National Institutes of Health: DC-00281, DC-00516, DC-00030, and NS-07309. The data were collected during 1988–89 when E. T. Stathopoulos was a Visiting Research Scientist at the University of Arizona.
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