Generalization Patterns Associated With Training Least Phonological Knowledge This study examined the relationship between productive phonological knowledge and generalization learning patterns in phonologically disordered children. Nine functionally misarticulating children (ages 3:8–5:9) were trained on aspects of their phonological systems that were characterized as inventory constraints that constituted “least phonological knowledge” in relation to the adult sound system (Elbert ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1991
Generalization Patterns Associated With Training Least Phonological Knowledge
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. Lynn Williams
    California State University, Fullerton
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to A. Lynn Williams, Department of Speech Communication, California State University Fuller-ton, Fullerton, California 92634.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1991
Generalization Patterns Associated With Training Least Phonological Knowledge
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 722-733. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.733
History: Received January 12, 1990 , Accepted September 26, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 722-733. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.733
History: Received January 12, 1990; Accepted September 26, 1990

This study examined the relationship between productive phonological knowledge and generalization learning patterns in phonologically disordered children. Nine functionally misarticulating children (ages 3:8–5:9) were trained on aspects of their phonological systems that were characterized as inventory constraints that constituted “least phonological knowledge” in relation to the adult sound system (Elbert & Gierut, 1986). The misarticulated sounds were trained in the context of consonant clusters. Although all the subjects exhibited equivalent levels of phonological knowledge on the same misarticulated sounds and identical training was provided, three different learning patterns were observed. Results are discussed with regard to the characterization of phonological knowledge in underlying representations that are depicted as “non-adult-like” or incorrect relative to the target sound system. Implications for clinical assessment are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This study was part of a doctoral dissertation conducted at Indiana University. The input and contributions of the committee members are most appreciated. Special recognition goes to the children, their families, and the graduate students who participated in this study. The author is also thankful for the thoughtful reviews provided by Rita C. Naremore, Stephen Camarata, Carol Stoel-Gammon, and the two anonymous reviewers.
Support in preparing this manuscript was provided by an Affirmative Action Faculty Development Grant awarded by California State University, Fullerton. This research was supported in part by a grant from the Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, NIH Grant Number R01 NS 20976 to Indiana University, Bloomington.
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