A Study of Nasometric Values for Normal Nasal Resonance It was the purpose of this study to obtain nasalance values for a large number of normal adult subjects speaking a variety of dialects of English. The Nasometer was used to measure the amount of nasal acoustic energy in the speech of 148 normal adults from four geographical regions of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1991
A Study of Nasometric Values for Normal Nasal Resonance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Earl J. Seaver
    Department of Communicative Disorders Northern Illinois University
  • Roger M. Dalston
    Oral-Facial and Communicative Disorders Program Department of Surgery, Dental Ecology and Research Center, School of Medicine University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Herbert A. Leeper
    Department of Communicative Disorders University of Western Ontario
  • Larry E. Adams
    Department of Biocommunication School of Medicine and Dentistry University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Earl J. Seaver, Department of Communicative Disorders, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1991
A Study of Nasometric Values for Normal Nasal Resonance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 715-721. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.715
History: Received March 29, 1990 , Accepted September 23, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 1991, Vol. 34, 715-721. doi:10.1044/jshr.3404.715
History: Received March 29, 1990; Accepted September 23, 1990

It was the purpose of this study to obtain nasalance values for a large number of normal adult subjects speaking a variety of dialects of English. The Nasometer was used to measure the amount of nasal acoustic energy in the speech of 148 normal adults from four geographical regions of North America. Means and standard deviations for the nasalance and deviation scores are presented for each of three different reading passages. The Mid-Atlantic speakers were found to have significantly higher nasalance scores on all three reading passages. In addition, the female subjects had significantly higher nasalance scores on the Nasal Sentences. These differences are discussed with regard to potential reasons for their existence implications for understanding velopharyngeal function in normal and abnormal speakers.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by grants DE07105 and DE06957 of the National Institutes of Health.
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