The Effects of Visual Barriers Used During Auditory Training on Sound Transmission Clinicians often use barriers such as paper or cardboard to eliminate visual cues during auditory training activities. Comparison of three commonly used barriers revealed substantial differences in the transmission of acoustic signals. A screen made of speaker mesh, the most acoustically transparent of the barriers tested, was judged to be ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 1991
The Effects of Visual Barriers Used During Auditory Training on Sound Transmission
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kimberly J. Niday
    University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Jill L. Elfenbein
    University of Iowa Iowa City
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Jill L. Elfenbein, PhD, 125 SHC, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242.
Article Information
Hearing / Research Note
Research Note   |   June 01, 1991
The Effects of Visual Barriers Used During Auditory Training on Sound Transmission
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 694-696. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.694
History: Received February 26, 1990 , Accepted September 27, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 694-696. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.694
History: Received February 26, 1990; Accepted September 27, 1990

Clinicians often use barriers such as paper or cardboard to eliminate visual cues during auditory training activities. Comparison of three commonly used barriers revealed substantial differences in the transmission of acoustic signals. A screen made of speaker mesh, the most acoustically transparent of the barriers tested, was judged to be the best option available.

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