Some Relationships Between Intelligence and Auditory Discrimination Some of the earliest scientific attempts to understand the nature of intelligence investigated differences in sensory discrimination and reaction time. There is once again interest in the relations between such simple abilities and intelligence, partly as a result of the application of information-processing paradigms to the study of intelligence. Correlations ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1991
Some Relationships Between Intelligence and Auditory Discrimination
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Betty U. Watson
    Indiana University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Betty U. Watson, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, 3rd and Jordan, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405.
Article Information
Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1991
Some Relationships Between Intelligence and Auditory Discrimination
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 621-627. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.621
History: Received July 19, 1989 , Accepted July 14, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 621-627. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.621
History: Received July 19, 1989; Accepted July 14, 1990

Some of the earliest scientific attempts to understand the nature of intelligence investigated differences in sensory discrimination and reaction time. There is once again interest in the relations between such simple abilities and intelligence, partly as a result of the application of information-processing paradigms to the study of intelligence. Correlations in the range of .3 to .8 have been reported between psychometric measures of intelligence and performance on simple cognitive, sensory, and motor tasks The current study reports correlations between scores on a battery of auditory discrimination tasks and measures of intelligence and academic aptitude in two samples of college students. The correlations between the intellectual and academic aptitude measures and the total percent correct on the auditory battery ranged from .45 to .59. These results are consistent with recent findings of significant relationships between simple sensory, cognitive, and motor abilities and psychometric intelligence as well as with much earlier reports by Spearman (1904) and others of relationships between pitch discrimination and intelligence. An implication of these findings is that intelligence is a potential confounding variable in studies of the auditory perceptual abilities of various clinical populations.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute of Health Grant R01 DC 00250.
The helpful comments of C.S. Watson on earlier versions of this manuscript are gratefully acknowledged.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access