The Use of an Invented Language Rule in the Differentiation of Normal and Language-Impaired Spanish-Speaking Children The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the results of a language-teaching procedure could be used to identify specific language-impaired children in a group of bilingual children with limited English proficiency (LEP). An invented morpheme was taught to two groups of LEP children who had been previously ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1991
The Use of an Invented Language Rule in the Differentiation of Normal and Language-Impaired Spanish-Speaking Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Celeste A. Roseberry
    John Muir Medical Center Walnut Creek, CA
  • Phil J. Connell
    Indiana University Bloomington
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Phil J. Connell, PhD, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405.
Article Information
Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1991
The Use of an Invented Language Rule in the Differentiation of Normal and Language-Impaired Spanish-Speaking Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 596-603. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.596
History: Received February 11, 1990 , Accepted July 5, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 596-603. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.596
History: Received February 11, 1990; Accepted July 5, 1990

The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the results of a language-teaching procedure could be used to identify specific language-impaired children in a group of bilingual children with limited English proficiency (LEP). An invented morpheme was taught to two groups of LEP children who had been previously identified as normal and specific language-impaired. The language-impaired group learned the morpheme at a slower rate than the normal children, thus allowing the two groups to be differentiated. The approach promises to circumvent many of the obstacles that impede current practices for identifying language impairment in the LEP population.

Acknowledgments
Part of this work was supported by a grant to Indiana University from the National Institutes of Health (DC 00495).
A number of individuals from the Contra Costa County Unified School District helped make this study possible, and their help is gratefully acknowledged: Jackie McGuire, Jean Rassushin, llario Puentes, Margaret Benavides, Irma Lerma, Natalie Diaz, Holly Baumgartener, Seferino Arevlo, Iris Contreras, Linda Elliot, Maxine Burnworth, Pat Lasarte, Mario Mensini, and Wayne Miller. The contributions of Beverly Roseberry and Katina Frank are also recognized, as are those of Addison Stone and Linda Schinke-Llano. The editorial direction of Lynn Snyder was greatly appreciated.
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