The Validity of a Parent Report Measure of Vocabulary and Syntax at 24 Months Parent report can provide valuable information on early child language development for clinical and research purposes. Previous research has documented the validity of parent report as an overall assessment of child language and as a measure of expressive vocabulary. In this project, a newly revised questionnaire for the assessment of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1991
The Validity of a Parent Report Measure of Vocabulary and Syntax at 24 Months
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Philip S. Dale
    University of Washington
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Philip S. Dale, PhD, Department of Psychology, University of Washington NI-25, Seattle, WA 98195.
Article Information
Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1991
The Validity of a Parent Report Measure of Vocabulary and Syntax at 24 Months
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 565-571. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.565
History: Received March 7, 1990 , Accepted September 4, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 565-571. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.565
History: Received March 7, 1990; Accepted September 4, 1990

Parent report can provide valuable information on early child language development for clinical and research purposes. Previous research has documented the validity of parent report as an overall assessment of child language and as a measure of expressive vocabulary. In this project, a newly revised questionnaire for the assessment of vocabulary and syntactic development, the MacArthur Communicative Development Inventory: Toddlers, is evaluated. Twentyfour children at 24 months were seen for a laboratory assessment including the Expressive One-Word Picture Vocabulary Test, the Memory for Sentences subtest of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale: Fourth Edition, and selected items of the Sequenced Inventory of Communicative Development. In addition, a language sample was recorded, from which mean length of utterance and other measures were derived. Concurrent validity correlations demonstrate high validity for parent report in both domains (r= .73–.79), and some ability to differentially assess the two.

Acknowledgments
The research reported in this paper was supported by grants from the MacArthur Research Network on Early Childhood Transitions. I am grateful to Karma Augerot, Anita Jones, Amy Julian, and Cheryl Mercer for their assistance in testing and language transcription and analysis on this project, and to my MacArthur Network colleagues on this project for their invaluable assistance in the design of this research and the preparation of this report
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