Children’s Knowledge of Auditory/Articulatory Correspondences Phonologic and Metaphonologic Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1991
Children’s Knowledge of Auditory/Articulatory Correspondences
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harriet B. Klein
    New York University
  • Susan H. Lederer
    New York University
  • Emma E. Cortese
    New York University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Harriet B. Klein, PhD, Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, New York University, New York, NY 10003.
Article Information
Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1991
Children’s Knowledge of Auditory/Articulatory Correspondences
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 559-564. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.559
History: Received January 19, 1990 , Accepted August 17, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 559-564. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.559
History: Received January 19, 1990; Accepted August 17, 1990

Forty-five normally developing children, 15 within each group of mean ages 5, 6, and 7, participated in a metaphonologic study examining the knowledge of auditory/articulatory correspondences Tasks included (a) a nonverbal identification of correspondences by selecting the appropriate side of a split video screen display, and (b) a verbal explanation of the cues used to motivate this choice. With development, there were significant increases in numbers of correct responses on the nonverbal task and corresponding changes in relative proportions of verbal explanation types. No significant relationship between level of performance on metaphonologic tasks and phoneme production skill was found.

Acknowledgments
The authors gratefully thank Valerie Raymond and the children of the Little Red School House for their participation in the study. We also thank those who assisted with the preparation of the stimulus tape—Ann Fiddler and the other members of the Teaching Performance Center at New York University for recording and editing, and Katherine Sitaras for judging. We thank Sharon Weinberg for statistical assistance. We appreciate the helpful comments of Elaine Altman, Nelson Moses, Naomi Schiff-Myers, and Cecile Spector on earlier drafts. Reports of this study were presented at the Annual Conventions of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (1988) and the New York State Speech Language and Hearing Association (1989).
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