The Effects of Sampling Conditions on Sentence Production in Normal, Reading-Disabled, and Language-Learning-Disabled Children This study explored the effects of contextual support, discourse genre, and the listener’s knowledge of information on syntactic and phonologic production and fluency. Subjects were language-learning-disabled, reading-disabled, and normal primary school children. Clause structure complexity, fluency, and grammatical and phonemic accuracy tended to be highest when children were discussing absent ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1991
The Effects of Sampling Conditions on Sentence Production in Normal, Reading-Disabled, and Language-Learning-Disabled Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie J. Masterson
    Department of Communicative Disorders The University of Mississippi
  • Alan G. Kamhi
    Memphis State University, TN
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Julie J. Masterson, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 39531.
Article Information
Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1991
The Effects of Sampling Conditions on Sentence Production in Normal, Reading-Disabled, and Language-Learning-Disabled Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 549-558. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.549
History: Received March 23, 1990 , Accepted August 22, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 549-558. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.549
History: Received March 23, 1990; Accepted August 22, 1990

This study explored the effects of contextual support, discourse genre, and the listener’s knowledge of information on syntactic and phonologic production and fluency. Subjects were language-learning-disabled, reading-disabled, and normal primary school children. Clause structure complexity, fluency, and grammatical and phonemic accuracy tended to be highest when children were discussing absent referents, providing explanations and stories, and giving unshared information. These effects were generally the same across all groups, although some effects were significant for only the language-learning-disabled children. Several explanations for these findings are considered.

Acknowledgments
This research was based on author Masterson’s dissertation, conducted under the direction of author Kamhi at Memphis State University. We appreciate the assistance of Ann Carpenter and the Marion Public Schools in obtaining subjects. Special thanks also go to Karen Pollack for her helpful comments regarding an earlier version of this manuscript and to Julie Cook and Susan Terwilliger for their assistance in reliability checks. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the 1987 ASHA Convention, New Orleans, LA.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access