Laryngeal Perturbation Analysis Minimum Length of Analysis Window Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 1991
Laryngeal Perturbation Analysis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael P. Karnell
    Center for Speech and Swallowing Disorders Pritzker School of Medicine The Untversity of Chicago
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Michael P. Karnell, PhD, University of Chicago Medical Center, Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, Box 412, Chicago, IL 60637.
Article Information
Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   June 01, 1991
Laryngeal Perturbation Analysis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 544-548. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.544
History: Received April 9, 1990 , Accepted August 24, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 544-548. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.544
History: Received April 9, 1990; Accepted August 24, 1990

Laryngeal perturbation measures have been applied to the analysis of cycle-to-cycle changes in periodicity and amplitude of the acoustic voice signal for more than 25 years. Although such measures enjoy widespread clinical application, there is little agreement about basic methodology, including the length of signal to be analyzed. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in laryngeal perturbation measures as a function of length of signal analyzed in 18 subjects who complained of symptoms of possible laryngeal dysfunction. The results showed that as many as 190 cycles may be necessary before jitter asymptotes and as many as 130 cycles may be necessary before shimmer asymptotes. Pathological voices may require a longer analysis window for perturbation analysis than do nonpathological voices.

Acknowledgments
The author expresses his appreciation to Ligang Li for his valuable assistance in data measurement and analysis and to Ronald C. Scherer for his helpful comments.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access