Multidimensional Scaling Analysis of Dysphonia in Two Speaker Groups The objective of this research was to identify perceptually relevant features of 30 dysphonic female voices. The perceptual dimensions used by listeners in judging the similarity of the dysphonic voices were derived in two multidimensional scaling (MDS) procedures using ALSCAL Three dimensions were extracted in each MDS solution and accounted ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1991
Multidimensional Scaling Analysis of Dysphonia in Two Speaker Groups
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gail B. Kempster
    Governors State University University Park, IL
  • Doris J. Kistler
    Waisman Center Madison, WI
  • James Hillenbrand
    Western Michigan University Kalamazoo
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Gail B. Kempster, PhD, Governors State University, College of Health Professions, University Park, IL 60466.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1991
Multidimensional Scaling Analysis of Dysphonia in Two Speaker Groups
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 534-543. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.534
History: Received February 9, 1990 , Accepted August 31, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 534-543. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.534
History: Received February 9, 1990; Accepted August 31, 1990

The objective of this research was to identify perceptually relevant features of 30 dysphonic female voices. The perceptual dimensions used by listeners in judging the similarity of the dysphonic voices were derived in two multidimensional scaling (MDS) procedures using ALSCAL Three dimensions were extracted in each MDS solution and accounted for approximately 60% of the total variance in the judgments. The three dimensions were related to measures of intensity, frequency, and perturbation. The results are discussed in relation to how clinicians use perceptual judgments in evaluating dysphonic voices.

Acknowledgments
This article was based on a doctoral dissertation completed at Northwestern University by Gail Kempster under the direction of Doris Kistler. The authors would like to acknowledge the contributions made by Hilda Fisher, Ph.D., and Jeri Logemann, Ph.D., in completing this investigation. Partial support for this work was received through a Dissertation Year Grant from Northwestern University.
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