Changes in Speech Breathing Following Cochlear Implant in Postlingually Deafened Adults Three postlingually deafened adults who received cochlear implants read passages before and after their prostheses were activated while their lung volumes were measured with an Inductive plethysmograph that transduced the cross-sectional areas of the speaker’s chest and abdomen. Lung volumes at the initiation and termination of the speakers’ expiratory limbs, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1991
Changes in Speech Breathing Following Cochlear Implant in Postlingually Deafened Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harlan Lane
    Department of Otolaryngology Harvard Medical School Boston, MA, and Research Laboratory of Electronics Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA, and Northeastern University Boston, MA
  • Joseph Perkell
    Department of Otolaryngology Harvard Medical School Boston, MA, and Research Laboratory of Electronics Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA
  • Mario Svirsky
    Department of Otolaryngology Harvard Medical School Boston, MA, and Research Laboratory of Electronics Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA
  • Jane Webster
    Department of Otolaryngology Harvard Medical School Boston, MA, and Research Laboratory of Electronics Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Harlan Lane, PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Room 36–511, Cambridge MA 02139.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1991
Changes in Speech Breathing Following Cochlear Implant in Postlingually Deafened Adults
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 526-533. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.526
History: Received January 3, 1990 , Accepted August 28, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 526-533. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.526
History: Received January 3, 1990; Accepted August 28, 1990

Three postlingually deafened adults who received cochlear implants read passages before and after their prostheses were activated while their lung volumes were measured with an Inductive plethysmograph that transduced the cross-sectional areas of the speaker’s chest and abdomen. Lung volumes at the initiation and termination of the speakers’ expiratory limbs, their average air flow, and the volume of air they expended per syllable were derived from tracings of calibrated lung volume displayed by computer. The activation of the speakers’ cochlear prostheses was followed in every case by a significant change in average airflow, which rose for two subjects with initially low flow rates and fell for one subject who had a much higher average preimplant flow rate. These changes in average flow rate were accompanied by corresponding changes in volume of air expended per syllable, statistically reliable in two of the three cases. There were no significant changes in the levels at which speakers initiated their expiratory limbs, but one speaker, after his prosthesis was activated, reliably increased the level of air in his lungs at the end of expiratory limbs to an average value that no longer required him to draw on expiratory reserve volume.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by a grant from NINCDS (NS 23734) to the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Dr. Joseph Nadol, principal investigator. The Audiology Department of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Dr. Aaron Thornton, director, provided audiometric evaluation. Dr. Donald Eddingon, director, Cochlear Implant Research Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, fitted the prosthetic devices. Dr. Eddington and Dr. William Rabinowitz, of the Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, provided the evaluations of speech reception. Dr. Eva Holmberg, Research Laboratory of Electronics, M.I.T., assisted in research design and analysis. Dr. Stephen Loring of the Harvard University School of Public Health and Dr. Nancy McGarr of Haskins Laboratories gave us their advice on measurement of respiration and on materials for elicitation, respectively. Dr. Robert Rosenthal of Harvard University provided advice on statistical analysis.
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