A Continuous-Flow Model for Phonatory Reaction Time The purpose of this study was to validate a proposed continuous-flow model of phonatory reaction time by investigating the temporal order of selected laryngeal and neurophysiological events involved in a phonatory reaction time task. Ten normal speakers participated in a phonatory reaction time task. Laryngeal positioning movements prior to vocal ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1991
A Continuous-Flow Model for Phonatory Reaction Time
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carole Ferrand
    Hofstra University Hempstead, NY
  • Gordon W. Blood
    The Pennsylvania State University University Park
  • Harvey R. Gilbert
    The Pennsylvania State University University Park
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Carole Ferrand, PhD, Hofstra University, Department of Speech Arts and Sciences, Davison Hall, Hempstead, NY 11550.
  • Currently affiliated with University of Connecticut, Storrs
    Currently affiliated with University of Connecticut, Storrs×
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1991
A Continuous-Flow Model for Phonatory Reaction Time
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 517-525. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.517
History: Received February 26, 1990 , Accepted August 13, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 517-525. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.517
History: Received February 26, 1990; Accepted August 13, 1990

The purpose of this study was to validate a proposed continuous-flow model of phonatory reaction time by investigating the temporal order of selected laryngeal and neurophysiological events involved in a phonatory reaction time task. Ten normal speakers participated in a phonatory reaction time task. Laryngeal positioning movements prior to vocal fold closure (laryngeal shift) and onset of vocal fold vibration (acoustic onset) were recorded with an electroglottograph. P300 brain potentials were collected simultaneously, and they served as an index of a central process underlying reaction time. The obtained temporal ordering of laryngeal shift, P300, and acoustic onset supported a continuous-flow model of phonatory reaction time. Use of this model might yield information that is more accurate in explaining physiological function and more precise in describing temporal patterning than the serial model.

Acknowledgment
This study was based on Carole Ferrand’s doctoral dissertation, carried out at The Pennsylvania State University. She wishes to thank Major Leslie Peters and other researchers at the Human Engineering Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, both for the use of their equipment and for the generous support they provided throughout this investigation.
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