Acoustic Correlates of Pathologic Voice Types Listeners classified 49 samples of vowels /a/ and /i/ on the basis of four voice types: hoarse, breathy, strained, and normal. The vowels were analyzed acoustically for mean harmonic/noise differences in four spectral regions, average fundamental frequency, natural logarithm of fundamental frequency, and jitter. Discriminant analysis showed that classifications of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1991
Acoustic Correlates of Pathologic Voice Types
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Virginia Wolfe
    Auburn University at Montgomery Montgomery, AL
  • Richard Cornell
    Auburn University at Montgomery Montgomery, AL
  • Chester Palmer
    Auburn University at Montgomery Montgomery, AL
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Virginia Wolfe, PhD, Speech and Hearing Clinic, Auburn University of Montgomery, Montgomery, AL 36193-0408.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1991
Acoustic Correlates of Pathologic Voice Types
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 509-516. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.509
History: Received November 30, 1987 , Accepted August 27, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 509-516. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.509
History: Received November 30, 1987; Accepted August 27, 1990

Listeners classified 49 samples of vowels /a/ and /i/ on the basis of four voice types: hoarse, breathy, strained, and normal. The vowels were analyzed acoustically for mean harmonic/noise differences in four spectral regions, average fundamental frequency, natural logarithm of fundamental frequency, and jitter. Discriminant analysis showed that classifications of voice type were made with 80% accuracy using three acoustic parameters: (a) mean harmonic/noise difference factor (1–3.5 kHz), (b) natural log of fundamental frequency, and (c) vowel type. The significance of these particular acoustic parameters for the perception and classification of voice types is discussed.

Acknowledgments
The work reported in this study was supported in part by the National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke (1 R15 NS24150-01) and the Research-Grant-ln-Aid Program, Auburn University at Montgomery, AL.
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