The Production and Perception of Syllable Structure Much research on speech over the years has focused on uncovering examples of the nonlinear relationship between acoustics and perception (e.g., so-called “categorical perception”) and between articulation and acoustics [as described by Stevens’s (1972)  quantal theory]. In the present experiment we demonstrate that naturally occurring linear changes in articulation may ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1991
The Production and Perception of Syllable Structure
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Betty Tuller
    Program in Complex Systems and Brain Sciences and Department of Psychology Florida Atlantic University Boca Raton
  • J. A. S. Kelso
    Program in Complex Systems and Brain Sciences and Department of Psychology Florida Atlantic University Boca Raton
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Betty Tuller, PhD, Center for Complex Systems, Florida Atlantic University, P.O. Box 3091, Boca Raton, FL 33431-0991.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1991
The Production and Perception of Syllable Structure
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 501-508. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.501
History: Received February 16, 1990 , Accepted September 4, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 501-508. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.501
History: Received February 16, 1990; Accepted September 4, 1990

Much research on speech over the years has focused on uncovering examples of the nonlinear relationship between acoustics and perception (e.g., so-called “categorical perception”) and between articulation and acoustics [as described by Stevens’s (1972)  quantal theory]. In the present experiment we demonstrate that naturally occurring linear changes in articulation may also be perceived discontinuously. Specifically, linear changes in relative phase of glottal and oral movements are perceived as categorical changes in the location of syllable juncture. Thus, phase transitions observed during speech demarcate a change in syllabic organization.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by NIDCD grant DC-00411 and NIMH grant MH-42900, both to Florida Atlantic University. The authors thank Linda Fishman and Pamela Case for their help with data collection and analysis.
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