The Structure of Disfluency Behaviors in the Speech of Adult Stutterers Throughout the stuttering literature numerous references to a twofold classification of disfluency types are found. However, no rigorous empirical test of that dichotomous classification has been reported in the literature. This investigation was designed to conduct such a test in order to provide an empirical foundation for that distinction. The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1991
The Structure of Disfluency Behaviors in the Speech of Adult Stutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kerry E. Lewis
    Northwestern University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Kerry E. Lewis, PhD, 1526 S. E. Knight, Portland, OR 97202.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1991
The Structure of Disfluency Behaviors in the Speech of Adult Stutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 492-500. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.492
History: Received April 11, 1990 , Accepted August 24, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 492-500. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.492
History: Received April 11, 1990; Accepted August 24, 1990

Throughout the stuttering literature numerous references to a twofold classification of disfluency types are found. However, no rigorous empirical test of that dichotomous classification has been reported in the literature. This investigation was designed to conduct such a test in order to provide an empirical foundation for that distinction. The hypotheses stated that the relationships among disfluency behaviors were consistent with an underlying two-dimensional structure and specified the group of variables (disfluency behaviors) having primary association with each dimension. Instrumentation and procedures permitting reliable dentification and coding of nine disfluency behaviors were developed. This observational system was applied to baseline monologues obtained from 180 adult stutterers Results of factor analyses supported the hypotheses on the two-factor structure and on the disposition of the disfluency variables.

Acknowledgment
The research reported here was part of a doctoral dissertation completed by the author at Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, under the direction of Hugo H. Gregory.
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