The Establishment of Open Articulatory Postures by Deaf and Hearing Talkers Previous researchers have proposed that prelingually deafened talkers do not displace the tongue body to establish vowel steady-state postures and displace the jaw excessively. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the opening gesture lingual displacement patterns of three deaf and two hearing adult talkers. Cinefluorography and x-ray microbeam ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1991
The Establishment of Open Articulatory Postures by Deaf and Hearing Talkers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Tye-Murray
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery University of Iowa
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Nancy Tye-Murray, PhD, Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Iowa Hospitals, Iowa City, IA 52242.
Article Information
Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1991
The Establishment of Open Articulatory Postures by Deaf and Hearing Talkers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 453-459. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.453
History: Received October 30, 1989 , Accepted August 16, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1991, Vol. 34, 453-459. doi:10.1044/jshr.3403.453
History: Received October 30, 1989; Accepted August 16, 1990

Previous researchers have proposed that prelingually deafened talkers do not displace the tongue body to establish vowel steady-state postures and displace the jaw excessively. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the opening gesture lingual displacement patterns of three deaf and two hearing adult talkers. Cinefluorography and x-ray microbeam data indicated that the deaf subjects displaced their tongue bodies during the opening gestures. However, their glossal movement trajectories were qualitatively dissimilar to those of the hearing subjects. Whereas the hearing subjects moved the tongue differently for different vowel contexts, the deaf subjects had similar trajectories for all contexts. The common trajectories suggest that some deaf talkers contract their tongue muscles such that the tongue body moves similarly for all vowels. The deaf subjects also appeared to have a less flexible tongue body during speech production than the hearing subjects. Means for quantifying and comparing the lingual behaviors of deaf and hearing talkers are considered.

Acknowledgments
I thank Anne Smith, Randall Monsen, and an anonymous reviewer for their editorial comments, and Robert Nadler and the staff of the Waisman Center for assistance in data collection. This work was supported by NHI Grants N520466, NS16373, and NS-0755-22. These data were presented at the Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, New Orleans, 1989.
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