Perceptual Characteristics of Vowel and Prosody Production in Apraxic, Aphasic, and Dysarthric Speakers Narrow phonetic transcriptions and prosodic judgments were made of single-word imitations by apraxic (AOS), conduction aphasic (CA), and ataxic dysarthric (AD) speakers. AOS and AD subjects showed similar vowel error patterns, particularly predominant errors in low, tense, and back vowels, more distortions than other types of vowel errors, and predominant ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1991
Perceptual Characteristics of Vowel and Prosody Production in Apraxic, Aphasic, and Dysarthric Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katharine Odell
    Department of Communicative Disorders University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Malcolm R. McNeil
    Department of Communicative Disorders University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • John C. Rosenbek
    Speech Pathology and Audiology Service Veterans Administration Medical Center Madison, Wisconsin
  • Linda Hunter
    Department of African Languages and Linguistics University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Requests for reprints should be addressed to Katharine Odell or Malcolm R. McNeil, Ph.D., Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Dysarthria / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1991
Perceptual Characteristics of Vowel and Prosody Production in Apraxic, Aphasic, and Dysarthric Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 67-80. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.67
History: Received October 9, 1989 , Accepted April 5, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 67-80. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.67
History: Received October 9, 1989; Accepted April 5, 1990

Narrow phonetic transcriptions and prosodic judgments were made of single-word imitations by apraxic (AOS), conduction aphasic (CA), and ataxic dysarthric (AD) speakers. AOS and AD subjects showed similar vowel error patterns, particularly predominant errors in low, tense, and back vowels, more distortions than other types of vowel errors, and predominant errors in initial position of words and in monosyllabic words. The CA subjects displayed a different vowel error pattern, notably more substitutions than distortions, more errors in polysyllabic than monosyllabic words, and more errors in noninitial than initial positions of words. Analysis of prosodic features identifiable at the single-word level (e.g., syllabic stress, juncture, and struggles to initiate or complete productions) indicated that syllabic stress errors and more difficulty initiating than completing word production were characteristic of AOS and AD but not CA subjects.

Acknowledgments
This research is supported by NINCDS Grant No. N518797 and NINCDS Core Grant No. 5030 HD03352. We wish to express our appreciation to Jeffrey Metter, M.D., for reading the CT scans and to Claudia Blair and Gary Weismer for assistance with various aspects of the study. We also express our appreciation to Milly Boyer for her help in manuscript preparation.
A portion of the data in this manuscript was presented at the 1989 Clinical Aphasiology Conference, Lake Tahoe, NM.
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