Speech-Associated Attitudes of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Children A Dutch version of the Communication Attitude Test (Brutten, 1985) was used to assess the speech-associated attitudes of 70 stuttering and 271 nonstuttering Belgian children of elementary and middle school age. The results showed that the stuttering children evidenced significantly more negative attitudes toward speech than did their nonstuttering peers. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 1991
Speech-Associated Attitudes of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Luc F. De Nil
    Southern Illinois University
  • Gene J. Brutten
    Southern Illinois University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Luc F. De Nil, Ph.D., Graduate Department of Speech Pathology, University of Toronto, 88 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L4.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 1991
Speech-Associated Attitudes of Stuttering and Nonstuttering Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 60-66. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.60
History: Received October 27, 1989 , Accepted May 9, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 60-66. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.60
History: Received October 27, 1989; Accepted May 9, 1990

A Dutch version of the Communication Attitude Test (Brutten, 1985) was used to assess the speech-associated attitudes of 70 stuttering and 271 nonstuttering Belgian children of elementary and middle school age. The results showed that the stuttering children evidenced significantly more negative attitudes toward speech than did their nonstuttering peers. This difference was present from age 7, the youngest age group studied, on up. Moreover, a significant group x age interaction revealed that the speech-related attitudes of the stuttering children became more negative with increasing age. In contrast, those of the nonstuttering children became less negative after age 9. These findings suggest that, in the course of fluency therapy for youngsters who stutter, negative attitudes toward speech should be addressed. This is especially true if, as with adults who stutter, negative attitudes are predictive of therapeutic failure.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank the directors and speech therapists in the cooperating speech rehabilitation centers and the principals and teachers of the grade schools in which the data for this study were collected. Especially, they would like to thank Marc Claeys, who coordinated the process of data collection in Belgium. Special thanks also to Klaas Bakker, Ph.D., and Lieve De Nil, M.A., who assisted Luc De Nil in translating the original English version of the CAT into Dutch.
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