The Effect of Direct Selection and Circular Scanning on Visual Sequential Recall The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of selection techniques on visual sequential recall. Specifically, this study investigated whether there are visual sequential recall differences between direct selection and scanning in task performance in normally developing 4-year-old children. Results suggested that there were no significant differences between ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1991
The Effect of Direct Selection and Circular Scanning on Visual Sequential Recall
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Mizuko
    University of Minnesota, Duluth
  • Joan Esser
    University of Minnesota, Duluth
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Mark Mizuko, Ph.D., Department of Allied Clinical Health, University of Minnesota, 242 Montague, 10 University Drive, Duluth, MN 55812.
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1991
The Effect of Direct Selection and Circular Scanning on Visual Sequential Recall
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 43-48. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.43
History: Received September 18, 1989 , Accepted April 9, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 43-48. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.43
History: Received September 18, 1989; Accepted April 9, 1990

The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of selection techniques on visual sequential recall. Specifically, this study investigated whether there are visual sequential recall differences between direct selection and scanning in task performance in normally developing 4-year-old children. Results suggested that there were no significant differences between direct selection and scanning for visual sequential recall. However, subjects correctly recalled significantly fewer symbols in a specific sequence represented by Blissymbols than by Picsyms. In addition they recalled significantly fewer three-symbol sequences than two-symbol sequences regardless of the type of symbol set.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank the Eddy Neurocommunication Center, University of Minnesota, Duluth, for its financial assistance in supporting this research. In addition, the authors thank the staff and children of the day care programs in the Duluth/Superior area for their participation in this research.
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