The Effects of a Tracheostoma Valve on the Intelligibility and Quality of Tracheoesophageal Speech In a listening experiment, speech samples obtained from a tracheoesophageal speaker were judged for intelligibility and general quality by inexperienced and experienced listeners. The speaker produced the speech samples using finger occlusion of the stoma and using a tracheostoma valve. Results showed no significant differences in intelligibility of speech between ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1991
The Effects of a Tracheostoma Valve on the Intelligibility and Quality of Tracheoesophageal Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Pamela A. Fujimoto
    Washington State University
  • Charles L. Madison
    Washington State University
  • Lynn B. Larrigan
    Washington State University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Charles L. Madison, Ph.D., Speech and Hearing Clinic, Daggy Hall, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2420.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1991
The Effects of a Tracheostoma Valve on the Intelligibility and Quality of Tracheoesophageal Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 33-36. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.33
History: Received September 9, 1989 , Accepted March 26, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 33-36. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.33
History: Received September 9, 1989; Accepted March 26, 1990

In a listening experiment, speech samples obtained from a tracheoesophageal speaker were judged for intelligibility and general quality by inexperienced and experienced listeners. The speaker produced the speech samples using finger occlusion of the stoma and using a tracheostoma valve. Results showed no significant differences in intelligibility of speech between occlusion conditions for single words, 5-word sentences, and 10-word sentences. Conversational intelligibility was judged to be adversely affected by the tracheostoma valve, though quality of speech was not. No significant differences were found between the judgments of inexperienced and experienced listeners.

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