An Evaluation of CAST A Computer-Aided Speechreading Training Program Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1991
An Evaluation of CAST
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jean-Pierre Gagné
    Elborn College University of Western Ontario London, Ontario
  • Dianne Dinon
    Elborn College University of Western Ontario London, Ontario
  • Joanne Parsons
    Elborn College University of Western Ontario London, Ontario
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Jean-Pierre Gagné, Ph.D., Department of Communicative Disorders, Elborn College, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6G 1H1.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1991
An Evaluation of CAST
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 213-221. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.213
History: Received October 31, 1989 , Accepted March 26, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 213-221. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.213
History: Received October 31, 1989; Accepted March 26, 1990

This study assessed the effectiveness of CAST (Computer-Aided Speechreading Training program). Two groups of 8 normal-hearing adults completed a pretraining visual speech perception test protocol that consisted of a Visual-Consonant Recognition Test, a test of Sentence Understanding Without Context, a test of Sentence Understanding With Context, and a semiautomated modified Continuous Discourse Tracking activity available with CAST. One group completed the CAST program. A posttraining test protocol was administered to the subjects 2 weeks following the maximum time provided to complete the training program (i.e., 10 weeks). Independent t tests revealed no differences between the control group and the experimental group in the percentage improvement score obtained on the following measures: viseme recognition score, Sentence Understanding Without Context (key word and total word recognition scores), and Sentence Understanding With Context (key word recognition score). Significant differences between the groups were found for the total word recognition score on the Sentence Understanding With Context test and the CAST modified Continuous Discourse Tracking activity. The results indicate that CAST was most effective in developing aspects of synthetic visual speech perception skills.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a Health System-Linked Research Unit Grant from the Ministry of Health (Ontario) and an equipment grant from the Ministry of Health (Ontario) Lottery Funds for Clinical Research. We are very grateful to K. Pichora-Fuller and M. Cicchelli for providing the CAST program as well as for their technical help and advice throughout the course of the project. Also, we wish to acknowledge E. Nicolaou for her contribution to this project. Finally, we would like to thank E. Baird and B. Bentley for their assistance in preparing the manuscript and to D. Greenaway and R. C. Seewald for their comments on earlier drafts of the manuscript. A version of this report was presented at the annual conference of the Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists held in Toronto, Ontario, May 1989.
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