The Design of CAST (Computer-Aided Speechreading Training) The underlying theoretical assumptions, goals, design, and implementation of a Computer-Aided Speechreading Training system (CAST) are described as a case study in program design. This computerized speechreading assessment and training system simulates face-to-face intervention and is designed to be one component of a comprehensive aural rehabilitation program for preretirement adults ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1991
The Design of CAST (Computer-Aided Speechreading Training)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Margaret Kathleen Pichora-Fuller
    University of Toronto, Ontario
  • André-Pierre Benguerel
    University of British Columbia Vancouver
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Margaret Kathleen Pichora-Fuller, Ph.D., School of Audiology and Speech Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1W5.
Article Information
Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1991
The Design of CAST (Computer-Aided Speechreading Training)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 202-212. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.202
History: Received October 27, 1989 , Accepted March 29, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 202-212. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.202
History: Received October 27, 1989; Accepted March 29, 1990

The underlying theoretical assumptions, goals, design, and implementation of a Computer-Aided Speechreading Training system (CAST) are described as a case study in program design. This computerized speechreading assessment and training system simulates face-to-face intervention and is designed to be one component of a comprehensive aural rehabilitation program for preretirement adults with acquired mild-to-moderate hearing loss. The interactive, automated course consists of eight training lessons, each focusing on a particular viseme that is practiced by a modified discourse tracking method using viseme-specific texts. Three basic speechreading skills are emphasized: visual speech perception, use of linguistic redundancy, and use of feedback between message sender and receiver. These skills are evaluated separately by means of CAST tracking rate, receiver strategy, and inferred error type. Four example case assessments are provided to illustrate the potential applications of CAST as a standardizable rehabilitative tool. An independent program evaluation is provided in a companion paper (Gagné, Dinon, & Parsons, 1991). Comparisons between CAST, face-to-face tracking procedures, and natural discourse are presented and discussed with reference to theoretical and clinical issues in speechreading and program evaluation.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported by a donation from Bell Canada to the Mount Sinai Hospital Research Foundation.
We gratefully acknowledge the support of the Silverman Family Foundation and the Frank Gerstein Family Foundation.
M. K. Pichora-Fuller is supported by Ontario Ministry of Health, Health Research Personnel Development Program Fellowship #01862.
Programming for CAST was done by Mauro Cicchelli. Louise Abergel assisted in the analysis of the lesson materials. Data were obtained with the cooperation of the staff of the Otologic Function Unit at Mount Sinai Hospital and Toronto General Hospital.
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