The Effects of Information and Augmentative Communication Technique on Attitudes Toward Nonspeaking Individuals This study investigated the effects of printed factual information and three augmentative communication techniques on attitudes of nondisabled individuals toward nonspeaking persons with physical disabilities. Employing a 3 (augmentative communication techniques) x 2 (presence/absence of information) factorial design, subjects viewed a videotape depicting a nonspeaking adult having a conversation with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1991
The Effects of Information and Augmentative Communication Technique on Attitudes Toward Nonspeaking Individuals
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carole Wood Gorenflo
    Eastern Michigan University
  • Daniel W. Gorenflo
    University of Michigan
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Carole Wood Gorenflo, Ph.D., Speech-Language Impaired Program, Eastern Michigan University, 123 Rackham School of Special Education, Ypsilanti, Ml 48197.
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1991
The Effects of Information and Augmentative Communication Technique on Attitudes Toward Nonspeaking Individuals
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 19-26. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.19
History: Received June 7, 1989 , Accepted February 20, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 19-26. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.19
History: Received June 7, 1989; Accepted February 20, 1990

This study investigated the effects of printed factual information and three augmentative communication techniques on attitudes of nondisabled individuals toward nonspeaking persons with physical disabilities. Employing a 3 (augmentative communication techniques) x 2 (presence/absence of information) factorial design, subjects viewed a videotape depicting a nonspeaking adult having a conversation with a normal-speaking individual. Subjects in Condition 1 viewed a tape depicting the nonspeaking individual using unaided communication techniques; Condition 2 subjects viewed the individual using an alphabet board; subjects in Condition 3 viewed the individual using a computer-based voice output communication aid (VOCA). A scale assessing attitudes toward nonspeaking persons, the Attitudes Toward Nonspeaking Persons Scale (ATNP), was developed and validated for purposes of this study and was employed as the dependent measure. Results revealed that subjects expressed more favorable attitudes when provided with the additional information concerning the nonspeaking individual. Attitude favorability also increased with the sophistication of the augmentative communication technique.

Acknowledgments
This investigation was conducted as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at Michigan State University for the first author. A paper based on this study was presented at the convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, New Orleans, Louisiana, November 1987. The first author expresses appreciation to members of her dissertation committee, especially Michael W. Casby and John B. Eulenberg.
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