The Effects of Digital Quantization Error on Speech Intelligibility and Perceived Speech Quality The effects of digital quantization error upon speech intelligibility and perceived speech quality, for normally hearing subjects, were investigated for digitized speech processed to simulate 6-, 8-, 10-, 12-, 14-, and 16-bit integer conversion and 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7-bit floating-point conversion. For the integer data, there were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1991
The Effects of Digital Quantization Error on Speech Intelligibility and Perceived Speech Quality
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard W. Harris
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Brigham Young University
  • Robert H. Brey
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Brigham Young University
  • Yuan-Shu Chang
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Brigham Young University
  • B. Diann Soria
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Brigham Young University
  • Laurence M. Hilton
    Communication Sciences and Disorders Brigham Young University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Richard W. Harris, Communication Sciences and Disorders, 131 TLRB, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1991
The Effects of Digital Quantization Error on Speech Intelligibility and Perceived Speech Quality
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 189-196. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.189
History: Received March 16, 1990 , Accepted July 12, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 189-196. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.189
History: Received March 16, 1990; Accepted July 12, 1990

The effects of digital quantization error upon speech intelligibility and perceived speech quality, for normally hearing subjects, were investigated for digitized speech processed to simulate 6-, 8-, 10-, 12-, 14-, and 16-bit integer conversion and 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-, and 7-bit floating-point conversion. For the integer data, there were no significant differences in speech intelligibility for 8- to 16-bit conversion. Only 6-bit integer conversion at 55 dB SPL resulted in a significant degradation in speech intelligibility. For the floating-point data, there were no significant differences in speech intelligibility for 2- to 7-bit floating-point conversion. However, results of the perceived quality experiment appeared to be more sensitive to differences among the various conditions. Speech processed using 12-, 14-, and 16-bit integer conversion was judged to be superior to speech processed using the 6-, 8-, and 10-bit integer conditions. Speech processed using 5-, 6-, and 7-bit floating-point conversion was judged to be superior to speech processed using 2-, 3-, and 4-bit floating-point conversion.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access