Magnitude Estimation and Cross-Modal Matching of Auditory and Lingual Vibrotactile Sensation by Normal Speakers and Stutterers The present experiment was a preliminary attempt to employ the psychophysical scaling methods of magnitude estimation and cross-modal matching to investigate suprathreshold auditory and lingual vibrotactile sensation magnitude responses for normal-speaking young adults (N= 20) and young adult stutterers (N= 7). A 1000-Hz binaural auditory stimulus and a 250-Hz lingual ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1991
Magnitude Estimation and Cross-Modal Matching of Auditory and Lingual Vibrotactile Sensation by Normal Speakers and Stutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel Harris
    Healthcare Rehabilitation Center Austin, TX
  • Donald Fucci
    Ohio University, Athens, OH
  • Linda Petrosino
    Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, OH
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Daniel Harris, Healthcare Rehabilitation Center, 1106 West Dittmar Lane, Austin, TX 78745.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1991
Magnitude Estimation and Cross-Modal Matching of Auditory and Lingual Vibrotactile Sensation by Normal Speakers and Stutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 177-182. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.177
History: Accepted June 4, 1990 , Received November 16, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 177-182. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.177
History: Accepted June 4, 1990; Received November 16, 1990

The present experiment was a preliminary attempt to employ the psychophysical scaling methods of magnitude estimation and cross-modal matching to investigate suprathreshold auditory and lingual vibrotactile sensation magnitude responses for normal-speaking young adults (N= 20) and young adult stutterers (N= 7). A 1000-Hz binaural auditory stimulus and a 250-Hz lingual vibrotactile stimulus were employed for both procedures. Results indicated that the stutterers tended to use more restricted response ranges than the normal speakers for auditory magnitude scaling, and lower response ranges than the normal speakers for lingual vibrotactile magnitude scaling.

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