Play-Language Relationships in Young Children With Developmental Delays Implications for Assessment Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1991
Play-Language Relationships in Young Children With Developmental Delays
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marianne D. Kennedy
    Connecticut College Program for Children with Special Needs Child Development Department New London
  • Margaret K. Sheridan
    Connecticut College Program for Children with Special Needs Child Development Department New London
  • Sara H. Radlinski
    Connecticut College Program for Children with Special Needs Child Development Department New London
  • Marjorie Beeghly
    Harvard Medical School and The Children’s Hospital, Boston
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Marianne Kennedy, M.A., Program for Children with Special Needs, Connecticut College, Box 5574, New London, CT 06320.
Article Information
Special Populations / Language Disorders / Language / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1991
Play-Language Relationships in Young Children With Developmental Delays
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 112-122. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.112
History: Received September 28, 1989 , Accepted February 26, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 1991, Vol. 34, 112-122. doi:10.1044/jshr.3401.112
History: Received September 28, 1989; Accepted February 26, 1990

The purpose of this longitudinal study was to determine whether the reported parallels between symbolic play and normal language development were evidenced in 6 children with developmental delays of varying etiologies. Subjects’ play and language behavior over a 6-month period was videotaped and analyzed during free play and modeling tasks. Although results supported the correspondences previously reported between normal language development and symbolic play, the variability across observations in the present subjects was more marked than expected. Implications for clinical assessment are discussed.

Acknowledgments
Excerpts from this article were presented at the annual meeting of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, November 1988, Boston, MA. The authors wish to thank Sharon Rowland and
Sue Wagner for their invaluable assistance in data collection, and the families of our subjects for their participation and continued interest.
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