Effects of Time Gating and Word Length on Isolated Word-Recognition Performance This study examined the effects of forward time gating and word length on monosyllabic isolated word-recognition performance. Fifty (60-ms) time-gated words were developed from a pre-recorded version (Auditec of St. Louis) of the Northwestern Auditory Test No. 6 (NU-6) List 1, Form A. A total of 358 time-gated items were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1990
Effects of Time Gating and Word Length on Isolated Word-Recognition Performance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Chie H. Craig
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Byoung W. Kim
    University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Requests for reprints Chie H. Craig, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, School of Allied Health Professions 2400 E. Hartford Ave, Enderis Hall 865, Milwaukee, WI 53201.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1990
Effects of Time Gating and Word Length on Isolated Word-Recognition Performance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1990, Vol. 33, 808-815. doi:10.1044/jshr.3304.808
History: Received March 20, 1989 , Accepted June 3, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1990, Vol. 33, 808-815. doi:10.1044/jshr.3304.808
History: Received March 20, 1989; Accepted June 3, 1990

This study examined the effects of forward time gating and word length on monosyllabic isolated word-recognition performance. Fifty (60-ms) time-gated words were developed from a pre-recorded version (Auditec of St. Louis) of the Northwestern Auditory Test No. 6 (NU-6) List 1, Form A. A total of 358 time-gated items were presented monaurally at 80 db SPL, and time-gated word identification, isolation point, acceptance point, and listener confidence measures were obtained from 20 normally hearing listeners. A comparison of conventional nontime-gated word-recognition scores obtained using the NU-6 List 4, Form C with the time-gated measures revealed that, even upon word offset, listeners recognized time-gated words less frequently and with less confidence. The time-gated findings also demonstrated that word length, based on word duration from onset to offset, significantly influenced real-time recognition performance.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was supported in part by the Graduate School of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee through a Graduate Research Committee Award and by the National Institute of Health (NINCDS) through an Academic Research Enhancement Award (HAR 1 R15 NS26017-01). The authors would also like to thank Richard Leucht for his contribution to the statistical analyses and Ngoctuyen T. Nguyen for her valued technical assistance. Miss Nguyen’s participation was sponsored by the Minority High School Research Apprenticeship Program through the National Institute of Health. Portions of this article were presented at the meetings of the Acoustical Society of America in Seattle, WA, May 1988, and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Boston, MA, November 1988.
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