Speech Breathing in Individuals with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Ten men with cervical spinal cord injury were studied using magnetometers to record surface motions of the chest wall during speech breathing. Individual speech breathing patterns reflected inspiratory and expiratory muscular sparing. Subjects compensated for expiratory muscle impairment by speaking at large lung volumes, presumably to take advantage of the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1990
Speech Breathing in Individuals with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    Harvard School of Public Health
  • Robert B. Banzett
    Harvard School of Public Health
  • Robert Brown
    Brockton/West Roxbury U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center
  • Stephen H. Loring
    Harvard School of Public Health
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Jeannette D. Hoit, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1990
Speech Breathing in Individuals with Cervical Spinal Cord Injury
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1990, Vol. 33, 798-807. doi:10.1044/jshr.3304.798
History: Received December 29, 1989 , Accepted July 5, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1990, Vol. 33, 798-807. doi:10.1044/jshr.3304.798
History: Received December 29, 1989; Accepted July 5, 1990

Ten men with cervical spinal cord injury were studied using magnetometers to record surface motions of the chest wall during speech breathing. Individual speech breathing patterns reflected inspiratory and expiratory muscular sparing. Subjects compensated for expiratory muscle impairment by speaking at large lung volumes, presumably to take advantage of the higher recoil pressures available at those volumes. Similarly, subjects used larger lung volumes to increase loudness. Abnormal chest wall behavior was attributed in large part to loss of abdominal muscle function. Because of this, speech breathing in individuals with cervical spinal cord injury may be improved by the use of abdominal binders.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was supported by Clinical Investigator Development Award DC-00030, Research Grant DC-00281, Research Grant HL-19170, and Veterans Administration Merit Review Funding. This work was conducted while the first author was a Research Fellow in the Respiratory Biology Program at the Harvard School of Public Health, on leave from the University of Arizona Institute for Neurogenic Communication Disorders. We gratefully acknowledge Thomas J. Hixon, Joan Finkelstein, Peter J. Watson, Tina M. Mikel, Nazarene T. Mondello, David G. King, Carlos G. Tun, Mehdi Sarkarati, and Dominic K. Foo for their contributions. Special thanks go to the men who participated as subjects.
We dedicate this article to you, Tom Hixon, in recognition of your unique and far-reaching contributions to the field of speech science. From those of us whose lives you have touched—your colleagues, your students, and your clients—thank you!
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