Muscle Spindles in the Human Levator Veli Palatini and Palatoglossus Muscles Muscle spindles are present in many muscles of the speech mechanism including those of the jaw, tongue, larynx, and respiratory system. Past investigations that have examined muscles of the velopharynx for the presence of muscle spindles have reported their existence only in the tensor veli palatini and palatoglossus muscles. The ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1990
Muscle Spindles in the Human Levator Veli Palatini and Palatoglossus Muscles
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie M. Liss
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Requests for reprints should be directed to Julie M. Liss, Department of Communication Disorders, 115 Shevlin Hall, 164 Pillsbury Dr. S.E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
  • Currently affiliated with University of Minnesota.
    Currently affiliated with University of Minnesota.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1990
Muscle Spindles in the Human Levator Veli Palatini and Palatoglossus Muscles
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1990, Vol. 33, 736-746. doi:10.1044/jshr.3304.736
History: Received January 25, 1990 , Accepted May 17, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1990, Vol. 33, 736-746. doi:10.1044/jshr.3304.736
History: Received January 25, 1990; Accepted May 17, 1990

Muscle spindles are present in many muscles of the speech mechanism including those of the jaw, tongue, larynx, and respiratory system. Past investigations that have examined muscles of the velopharynx for the presence of muscle spindles have reported their existence only in the tensor veli palatini and palatoglossus muscles. The present investigation has demonstrated the existence of muscle spindles in two muscles of the human velopharynx—the levator veli palatini (LVP) and palatoglossus muscles. Seven LVP and two palatoglossus muscles were embedded in paraffin blocks, serially sectioned at 8 microns, and selected slides were stained by a modified Gomori trichrome technique. Scanning by light microscopy at 40x revealed spindles in all of the muscles examined. This positive finding likely reflects the use of a more chromatically distinctive staining procedure and a higher scanning magnification than were used in prior investigations. The potential roles of muscle spindles in velopharyngeal function are addressed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This work is derived from a doctoral dissertation completed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It was supported, in part, by a grant from the University of Wisconsin Medical School, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, and NIH award #NS18797. I would like to thank David Kuehn, John Folkins, and Hughlett Morris (University of Iowa) for access to unstained slides of levator veli palatini and palatoglossus tissue. I would also like to thank Stanley Ewanowski, Edward Bersu, Gary Weismer, Raymond Kent, Dave Garrett, and David Kuehn for serving on the dissertation committee. Gratitude is extended to Mick McNeil, and to Milly Boyer (clerical), Shirley Hunsaker (photography), and Elaine Langer (histology) for their expert technical support.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access