Speech-Recognition Difficulties of the Hearing-Impaired Elderly The Contributions of Audibility Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1990
Speech-Recognition Difficulties of the Hearing-Impaired Elderly
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Larry E. Humes
    Indiana University
  • Lisa Roberts
    Indiana University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Larry E. Humes, Indiana University, Audiology Research Laboratory, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Bloomington, IN 47405.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1990
Speech-Recognition Difficulties of the Hearing-Impaired Elderly
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1990, Vol. 33, 726-735. doi:10.1044/jshr.3304.726
History: Received January 17, 1990 , Accepted May 17, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1990, Vol. 33, 726-735. doi:10.1044/jshr.3304.726
History: Received January 17, 1990; Accepted May 17, 1990

The role that sensorineural hearing loss plays in the speech-recognition difficulties of the hearing-impaired elderly is examined. One approach to this issue was to make between-group comparisons of performance for three groups of subjects: (a) young normal-hearing adults; (b) elderly hearing-impaired adults; and (c) young normal-hearing adults with simulated sensorineural hearing loss equivalent to that of the elderly subjects produced by a spectrally shaped masking noise. Another approach to this issue employed correlational analyses to examine the relation between audibility and speech recognition within the group of elderly hearing-impaired subjects. An additional approach was pursued in which an acoustical index incorporating adjustments for threshold elevation was used to examine the role audibility played in the speech-recognition performance of the hearing-impaired elderly. A wide range of listening conditions was sampled in this experiment. The conclusion was that the primary determiner of speech-recognition performance in the elderly hearing-impaired subjects was their threshold elevation.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the National Institutes of Health, the technical support provided by Dave Montgomery and the cheerful participation of the subjects.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access