Effects of Aging on the Precedence Effect in Sound Localization The precedence effect in sound localization can be evoked by presenting identical sounds (e.g., clicks) from pairs of loudspeakers placed on opposite sides of a subject’s head. With appropriate inter-loudspeaker delays, normal subjects perceive a fused image originating from the side of the leading loudspeaker. Separate tests at loudspeaker delays ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1990
Effects of Aging on the Precedence Effect in Sound Localization
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jerry L. Cranford
    Wichita State University
  • Martha Boose
    Wichita State University
  • Christopher A. Moore
    University of Pittsburgh
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Jerry L. Cranford, Ph.D., Dept. Communicative Disorders and Sciences, Box 75, Wichita State University, Wichita, Kansas 67208.
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1990
Effects of Aging on the Precedence Effect in Sound Localization
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1990, Vol. 33, 654-659. doi:10.1044/jshr.3304.654
History: Received November 29, 1989 , Accepted May 2, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1990, Vol. 33, 654-659. doi:10.1044/jshr.3304.654
History: Received November 29, 1989; Accepted May 2, 1990

The precedence effect in sound localization can be evoked by presenting identical sounds (e.g., clicks) from pairs of loudspeakers placed on opposite sides of a subject’s head. With appropriate inter-loudspeaker delays, normal subjects perceive a fused image originating from the side of the leading loudspeaker. Separate tests at loudspeaker delays ranging from 0 to 8 ms were presented to groups of young and elderly subjects. At 0 ms delay, young subjects perceived the fused image to be located halfway between the loudspeakers; at progressively longer delays, the image was perceived closer to the leading loudspeaker. Significant numbers of elderly subjects exhibited discrimination difficulties with delays below 0.7 ms.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The authors would like to thank Michael Wynne, Ph.D., for his valuable comments on the revised draft of this article.
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