Effect of Formant Frequency Onset Variation on the Differentiation of Synthesized /w/ and /r/ Sounds The purpose of this study was to assess the use of psychophysical transformations for analyzing the differentiation of /w/ and /r/ sounds of children and adults. Stimuli from Adult and Child manifolds, consisting of 25 synthesized /Cej/-type utterances with different F2 and F3 onset frequencies, were presented in random order ... Research Note
Research Note  |   September 01, 1984
Effect of Formant Frequency Onset Variation on the Differentiation of Synthesized /w/ and /r/ Sounds
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donald J. Sharf
    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
  • Ralph N. Ohde
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
Article Information
Research Notes
Research Note   |   September 01, 1984
Effect of Formant Frequency Onset Variation on the Differentiation of Synthesized /w/ and /r/ Sounds
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1984, Vol. 27, 475-479. doi:10.1044/jshr.2703.475
History: Received January 3, 1984 , Accepted July 5, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1984, Vol. 27, 475-479. doi:10.1044/jshr.2703.475
History: Received January 3, 1984; Accepted July 5, 1984

The purpose of this study was to assess the use of psychophysical transformations for analyzing the differentiation of /w/ and /r/ sounds of children and adults. Stimuli from Adult and Child manifolds, consisting of 25 synthesized /Cej/-type utterances with different F2 and F3 onset frequencies, were presented in random order to eight naive subjects. Subjects rated the stimuli on a four-point scale between good /r/ and good /w/. Correlations between mel transformations and Bark transformations of the F3-F2 differences among the stimuli and their percent /r/ responses were close to or greater than .90. Predictions of percent /r/ responses derived from regression analyses based on mel transformations and Bark transformations of F3-F2 differences among stimuli indicated that some sounds identified as /w/ for /r/ substitutions could be differentiated from /w/ sounds. The category boundaries between /r/ and /w/ were estimated to be 5.0 Bark for adult stimuli and 5.7 Bark for child stimuli.

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