Symbolic Play in Normal and Language-Impaired Children The symbolic play of 15 normally developing (CA, 16–22 months) and 15 language-impaired children (CA, 32–49 months), whose productive language skills were at the single-word utterance level, was compared. Symbolic play was assessed formally through the Symbolic Play Test and informally through the observation of spontaneous play. The language-impaired children ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1984
Symbolic Play in Normal and Language-Impaired Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brenda Y. Terrell
    Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
  • Richard G. Schwartz
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Patricia A. Prelock
    Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA
  • Cheryl K. Messick
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1984
Symbolic Play in Normal and Language-Impaired Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1984, Vol. 27, 424-429. doi:10.1044/jshr.2703.424
History: Received May 3, 1982 , Accepted May 2, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1984, Vol. 27, 424-429. doi:10.1044/jshr.2703.424
History: Received May 3, 1982; Accepted May 2, 1984

The symbolic play of 15 normally developing (CA, 16–22 months) and 15 language-impaired children (CA, 32–49 months), whose productive language skills were at the single-word utterance level, was compared. Symbolic play was assessed formally through the Symbolic Play Test and informally through the observation of spontaneous play. The language-impaired children were found to be developmentally advanced when compared to the language-matched normal children in the level and direction of their symbolic play. Relative to age norms, however, the language-impaired children evidenced deficits in symbolic play. Thus, their linguistic and symbolic play abilities were not equally impaired. These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for the relationship between symbolic play and language and for the nature of specific language impairment.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access