Role of Mothers' Expansions in Stimulating Children's Language Production Mothers' expansions were examined for their role in structuring conversational contributions and facilitating spontaneous imitations and productions of two-term semantic relations not previously used by their children. The subjects were four 2-year-old boys in late Stage 1 of linguistic development and their mothers. The investigation consisted of two studies. Study ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1984
Role of Mothers' Expansions in Stimulating Children's Language Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy J. Scherer
    Providence Speech and Hearing Center, Orange, CA
  • Lesley B. Olswang
    University of Washington, Seattle
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1984
Role of Mothers' Expansions in Stimulating Children's Language Production
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1984, Vol. 27, 387-396. doi:10.1044/jshr.2703.387
History: Received April 4, 1983 , Accepted March 22, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1984, Vol. 27, 387-396. doi:10.1044/jshr.2703.387
History: Received April 4, 1983; Accepted March 22, 1984

Mothers' expansions were examined for their role in structuring conversational contributions and facilitating spontaneous imitations and productions of two-term semantic relations not previously used by their children. The subjects were four 2-year-old boys in late Stage 1 of linguistic development and their mothers. The investigation consisted of two studies. Study 1, a descriptive analysis of mother-child conversation, showed a contingent relationship between mothers' expansions and their children's use of spontaneous imitations. Study 2, an experimental procedure using a multiple baseline treatment design, showed that an increase in the mothers' expansions was systematically related to an increase in the children's initial spontaneous imitations of two-term semantic relations. Results also indicated that following the increase in spontaneous imitations, spontaneous productions of the two-term relations increased and were maintained, whereas spontaneous imitations subsequently decreased.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access