Word Recognition with Segmented-Alternated CVC Words A Preliminary Report on Listeners with Normal Hearing Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1984
Word Recognition with Segmented-Alternated CVC Words
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard H. Wilson
    VA Medical Center, Long Beach, California and University of California, Irvine
  • John T. Arcos
    VA Medical Center, Long Beach, California and University of California, Irvine
  • Howard C. Jones
    VA Medical Center, Long Beach, California and University of California, Irvine
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1984
Word Recognition with Segmented-Alternated CVC Words
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1984, Vol. 27, 378-386. doi:10.1044/jshr.2703.378
History: Received October 24, 1983 , Accepted April 25, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1984, Vol. 27, 378-386. doi:10.1044/jshr.2703.378
History: Received October 24, 1983; Accepted April 25, 1984

Consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) monosyllabic words were segmented at the approximate phoneme boundaries and were presented to subjects with normal hearing in the following sequence: (a) the carrier phrase to both ears, (b) the initial consonant segment to one ear, (c) the vowel segment to the other ear, and (d) the final consonant segment to the ear that received the initial consonant. A computer technique, which is described in detail, was used to develop the test materials. The digital editing did not alter appreciably the spectral or temporal characteristics of the words. A series of four experiments produced a list of 50 words on which 10% correct word recognition was achieved by listeners with normal hearing when the vowel segment or the consonant segments of the words were presented monaurally in isolation. When the speech materials were presented binaurally—that is, the vowel segment in one ear and consonant segments in the other ear—word-recognition performance improved to 90% correct.

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