Profiles of Communicative and Cognitive-Social Abilities in Autistic Children The purpose of this study was to examine profiles of communicative and cognitive-social abilities in a small group of autistic children functioning in the prelinguistic and early stages of language development and to compare them with those of normal children functioning at similar stages of language development. The results of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1984
Profiles of Communicative and Cognitive-Social Abilities in Autistic Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy Miller Wetherby
    Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Carol A. Prutting
    University of California, Santa Barbara
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1984
Profiles of Communicative and Cognitive-Social Abilities in Autistic Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1984, Vol. 27, 364-377. doi:10.1044/jshr.2703.364
History: Received July 27, 1983 , Accepted March 19, 1984
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1984, Vol. 27, 364-377. doi:10.1044/jshr.2703.364
History: Received July 27, 1983; Accepted March 19, 1984

The purpose of this study was to examine profiles of communicative and cognitive-social abilities in a small group of autistic children functioning in the prelinguistic and early stages of language development and to compare them with those of normal children functioning at similar stages of language development. The results of measures in the cognitive-social areas of communicative intent, tool use, imitation, and play and in language comprehension demonstrated uneven development for the autistic subjects. A functional analysis of communicative behaviors indicated that, despite a wide variation in communicative means, the autistic subjects displayed a relatively homogeneous profile of communicative functions that was both quantitatively and qualitatively different from the normal profile. Explanations for the heterochrony in communicative and cognitive-social development of these autistic children are discussed.

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