Vocal Fundamental Frequency Variability in Young Children Comments on Robb and Saxman (1985) Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   September 01, 1990
Vocal Fundamental Frequency Variability in Young Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Margaret Lahey
    Emerson College
  • Judy Flax
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Katherine Harris
    Graduate School, City University of New York
  • Arthur Boothroyd
    Graduate School, City University of New York
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   September 01, 1990
Vocal Fundamental Frequency Variability in Young Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 619-621. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.619b
History: Received June 2, 1989 , Accepted January 17, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 619-621. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.619b
History: Received June 2, 1989; Accepted January 17, 1990
One of the major findings of Robb and Saxman (1985)  regarding mean fundamental frequency (Fo) of children aged 11 to 25 months was the high variability found among utterances particularly for the youngest children (i.e., the 11–16-month-olds). Robb and Saxman hypothesized that such variability may have been related to the onset of purposeful communication. The data presented below further refine this hypothesis and suggest a strong relationship between Fo and the communicative function of infants’ vocalizations.
In a study designed to see if prosodic variables were related to communicative functions (Flax, 1986; Flax, Lahey, Harris, & Boothroyd, in press), we videotaped 1-hour mother-child interactions of 3 normally developing children (AL, AB, & RS) at three points in time. At Time 1 the mothers reported that the children were producing noncrying vocalizations that could be interpreted as serving some communicative function; at Time 2, the mothers’ diary entries indicated a ten-word vocabulary; at Time 3 the entries showed a vocabulary of about 50 words. The ages sampled ranged from 11 months to 22 months (see Table 1).
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access