Critical Differences in Aided Sound Field Thresholds in Children Variability of aided sound field thresholds (ASFTs) was examined in 30 children comprising two age groups (5–9 and 10–14 years). Test-retest ASFTs were collected at six frequencies (250, 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Hz). No statistically significant difference was found in mean test and retest ASFTs between the two ... Research Note
Research Note  |   September 01, 1990
Critical Differences in Aided Sound Field Thresholds in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrew Stuart
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Andrée Durieux-Smith
    Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario
  • Robert Stenstrom
    Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Andrew Stuart, School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, 5599 Fenwick Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H IR2.
Article Information
Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Research Note
Research Note   |   September 01, 1990
Critical Differences in Aided Sound Field Thresholds in Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 612-615. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.612
History: Received May 26, 1989 , Accepted October 30, 1989
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 612-615. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.612
History: Received May 26, 1989; Accepted October 30, 1989

Variability of aided sound field thresholds (ASFTs) was examined in 30 children comprising two age groups (5–9 and 10–14 years). Test-retest ASFTs were collected at six frequencies (250, 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, and 4000 Hz). No statistically significant difference was found in mean test and retest ASFTs between the two groups (p > .05). Test-retest difference data from both groups of children were combined and used to generate critical differences (in dB) for two ASFTs. At a 95% confidence level, two ASFTs would have to differ by more than 10 dB across signal test frequencies to attain statistical significance. In clinical decision-making, if one accepts smaller differences in ASFTs as statistically significant, larger probabilities of error must be assumed.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Paper presented in part at the Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists Annual Conference, Toronto, ON, Canada, May, 1989.
Funds for the project were provided by the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
The authors gratefully acknowledge Yves Beauregard, Nina Picton, Elizabeth Shaw-Pickard, and Corinne Yee for their assistance with data collection.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access