Syllable Durations of Preword and Early Word Vocalizations The continuity in development of syllable duration patterns was examined in 7 young children as they progressed from preword to multiword periods of vocalization development. Using a combination of lexical and chronological age points, monthly vocalization samples were analyzed for bisyllable duration and final syllable lengthening. Results revealed no systematic ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1990
Syllable Durations of Preword and Early Word Vocalizations
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael P. Robb
    University of Hawaii
  • John H. Saxman
    Syracuse University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Michael P. Robb, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Division of Speech Pathology & Audiology, University of Hawaii, 1410 Lower Campus Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1990
Syllable Durations of Preword and Early Word Vocalizations
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 583-593. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.583
History: Received February 13, 1989 , Accepted April 6, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 583-593. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.583
History: Received February 13, 1989; Accepted April 6, 1990

The continuity in development of syllable duration patterns was examined in 7 young children as they progressed from preword to multiword periods of vocalization development. Using a combination of lexical and chronological age points, monthly vocalization samples were analyzed for bisyllable duration and final syllable lengthening. Results revealed no systematic increase or decrease in the duration of bisyllables produced by the children as a group. Lengthening of final syllables was observed across nearly all recording sessions for all children. It is likely that the feature of bisyllable duration is not discernibly sensitive to changes associated with a developing speech mechanism and environmental input. On the other hand, the regularity in final syllable lengthening is consistent with a continuity theory of development.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors express their appreciation to Edward G. Conture and Mary Louise Edwards for their support and assistance during the course of this study. This work was supported in part by a Syracuse University/NIH Biomedical Research Support Grant.
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