Differential Learning of Phonological Oppositions This study evaluated whether variations in the structure of minimal versus maximal opposition treatments would result in empirical differences in phonological learning. Subjects were 3 children who excluded at least six sounds from their pretreatment phonetic and phonemic inventories. An alternating treatments design in combination with a staggered multiple baseline ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1990
Differential Learning of Phonological Oppositions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith A. Gierut
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Judith A. Gierut, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405.
Article Information
Development / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1990
Differential Learning of Phonological Oppositions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 540-549. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.540
History: Received March 9, 1989 , Accepted March 30, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 540-549. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.540
History: Received March 9, 1989; Accepted March 30, 1990

This study evaluated whether variations in the structure of minimal versus maximal opposition treatments would result in empirical differences in phonological learning. Subjects were 3 children who excluded at least six sounds from their pretreatment phonetic and phonemic inventories. An alternating treatments design in combination with a staggered multiple baseline across subjects was used to evaluate differences in learning the two types of oppositions. Results indicated that treatment of maximal oppositions led to greater improvement in the children’s production of treated sounds, more additions of untreated sounds to the posttreatment inventory, and fewer changes in known sounds than treatment of minimal oppositions. Moreover, individual differences suggested that phonological learning was enhanced not only by the number but also by the type of distinctions being taught. A potential sequence of relative clinical effectiveness was proposed such that teaching multiple and major class distinctions > teaching multiple distinctions > teaching few distinctions among sounds.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was supported in part by grants from the National Institutes of Health (R29 DC00433) and the Biomedical Research Support Grant Program (S07 RR 7031K) to Indiana University, Bloomington. I would like to thank Steve Chin, Phil Connell, and Dan Dinnsen for many productive discussions throughout this entire project. Bill Bowers assisted with inter-judge transcription reliability and the Clinical Faculty of the Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences with subject identification. Portions of this paper were presented at the Conference on Treatment Efficacy sponsored by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation, San Antonio, March 1989.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access