Simple Triangular Approximations of Auditory Filter Shapes At present, the most popular auditory filter shape model is one with a rounded peak and exponentially decaying filter skirts (Patterson & Moore, 1986). Unfortunately, the complex nature of this “roex” filter model may, in some instances, have hindered the application of the auditory filter shape in clinical measurements of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1990
Simple Triangular Approximations of Auditory Filter Shapes
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. Formby
    Departments of Communicative Disorders and Neurology, and the Psychoacoustics Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of Florida
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Craig Formby, Department of Otolaryngology, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, 600 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1990
Simple Triangular Approximations of Auditory Filter Shapes
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 530-539. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.530
History: Received July 5, 1989 , Accepted March 1, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 530-539. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.530
History: Received July 5, 1989; Accepted March 1, 1990

At present, the most popular auditory filter shape model is one with a rounded peak and exponentially decaying filter skirts (Patterson & Moore, 1986). Unfortunately, the complex nature of this “roex” filter model may, in some instances, have hindered the application of the auditory filter shape in clinical measurements of frequency selectivity. Moreover, some of the assumptions of the roex filter model may be violated at high sound-pressure levels (SPLs) and this limitation has also been a factor when considering the roex auditory filter shape in the clinic. Our purpose is to introduce a simplified method that is adequate for obtaining clinically useful estimates of triangular-shaped auditory filters. Although the triangular-shaped filter model faces the same problems as the roex model at high SPLs, the calculations and assumptions underlying the former are far less complicated. The triangular filter model also retains many of the qualitative properties and advantages afforded by roex-fitted auditory filter shapes. In this report, we review the basic concepts underlying auditory filter shape estimates and describe our methods for measuring and fitting the triangular-shaped filter model. We then present normative triangular filter shapes and compare these estimates with auditory filter shapes fitted by other means. Finally, we present selected examples of triangular filter shapes fitted to the masked thresholds of hearing-impaired patients. For the most part, the triangular-shaped filter model offers the clinician a satisfactory compromise for obtaining estimates of auditory filter shape and frequency selectivity at moderately intense and high SPLs.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
D. M. Green and R. Lufti provided helpful suggestions at various stages of this study and, along with J. Raney, provided criticism of some of the drafts of this report. L. Humes, W. Jesteadt, and two anonymous reviewers also provided helpful comments for revising this manuscript. J. Eischelsderfer provided editorial assistance and Z. Onsan and J. Fuller produced the figures. Support for this research was provided by NIH Clinical Investigator Development Award #NS01113.
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