Performance of Cochlear Implant Patients as a Function of Time The speech perception abilities of 15 patients were measured preoperatively using hearing aids and postoperatively using the Nucleus 22-channel cochlear implant over a period of 1, 2, or 3 years. Analysis of mean data revealed that, although the greatest amount of improvement in speech perception scores occurred between the preoperative ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1990
Performance of Cochlear Implant Patients as a Function of Time
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lynn G. Spivak
    Department of Otolaryngology, New York University Medical Center
  • Susan B. Waltzman
    Department of Otolaryngology, New York University Medical Center
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Susan B. Waltzman, Department of Otolaryngology, New York University Medical Center, 550 1st Avenue, New York, NY 10016.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1990
Performance of Cochlear Implant Patients as a Function of Time
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 511-519. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.511
History: Received December 14, 1988 , Accepted February 23, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 511-519. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.511
History: Received December 14, 1988; Accepted February 23, 1990

The speech perception abilities of 15 patients were measured preoperatively using hearing aids and postoperatively using the Nucleus 22-channel cochlear implant over a period of 1, 2, or 3 years. Analysis of mean data revealed that, although the greatest amount of improvement in speech perception scores occurred between the preoperative and 3-month poststimulation evaluation, there was also significant improvement in perception of segmental features and open-set speech recognition over the 3-year time period. When individual patient data were examined, however, it was clear that these improvements were due, in large part, to the performance of a subset of patients who had measurable open-set speech recognition abilities at the time of their 3-month, poststimulation evaluation. Subjects who used the processing scheme that included coding of F1 showed significantly more improvement over time than subjects who used the original FOF2 processing scheme exclusively. It was concluded that open-set speech recognition ability at 3 months is an important prognostic indicator of continued improvement in speech perception abilities over time.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The authors would like to thank William Shapiro for his help in collecting and assembling the data for this study. Portions of this study were presented at the 1987 annual meeting of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, New Orleans. This research was supported in part by a grant from NIHNINCDS #NS17764.
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