Selected Acoustic Characteristics of Voices Before Intubation and After Extubation Effects of endotracheal intubation on acoustic characteristics of voices were investigated for 8 male and 8 female subjects using a miniature neck accelerometer and computerized analysis methods. Variables extracted from sustained vowels were (1) spectral slopes of the average waveforms, (2) harmonics-to-noise ratios (H/N), (3) coefficients of variation for amplitude ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1990
Selected Acoustic Characteristics of Voices Before Intubation and After Extubation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yoshiyuki Horii
    Department of Communication Disorders and Speech Science, The University of Colorado, and Recording and Research Center, The Denver Center for the Performing Arts
  • Barbara F. Fuller
    School of Nursing, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Yoshiyuki Horii, Campus Box 409, CDSS, The University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1990
Selected Acoustic Characteristics of Voices Before Intubation and After Extubation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 505-510. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.505
History: Received October 6, 1989 , Accepted March 2, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 505-510. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.505
History: Received October 6, 1989; Accepted March 2, 1990

Effects of endotracheal intubation on acoustic characteristics of voices were investigated for 8 male and 8 female subjects using a miniature neck accelerometer and computerized analysis methods. Variables extracted from sustained vowels were (1) spectral slopes of the average waveforms, (2) harmonics-to-noise ratios (H/N), (3) coefficients of variation for amplitude (CVA), (4) coefficients of variation for fundamental frequency (CVF), (5) amplitude perturbation (shimmer), and (6) fundamental frequency perturbation (jitter). Fundamental frequency (Fo) distributional statistics (mean Fo, Fo standard deviation, and Fo mid-90% range) were also obtained from oral readings. Results for the sustained vowel samples showed that after extubation, (1) spectral slopes were less steep, and (2) both shimmer and jitter were greater than before intubation. Results for the passage reading revealed that the mean Fo was lower and the Fo standard deviation and mid-90% range were smaller after the extubation than before intubation. It was concluded that even short-term endotracheal intubation affects acoustic characteristics of voice and that selected measures of waveform characteristics are sensitive enough to reveal such effects.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This study was supported in part by the Center for Nursing Research of the University of Colorado School of Nursing and by the National Institutes of Health, grant numbers INR01468 and RO1NS24409.
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