Acoustical Durations of Speech Segments During Stuttering Adaptation Acoustical durations of stutter- and disfluency-free speech segments from Readings #1 and #5 in an adaptation series were measured in 4 adapting, 4 nonadapting, and 4 nonstuttering subjects. The segment durations measured were intervocalic interval, stop-gap, voice onset time, and vowel duration. No clear trends in the change of acoustical ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1990
Acoustical Durations of Speech Segments During Stuttering Adaptation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David Prins
    University of Washington
  • Carol P. Hubbard
    University of Washington
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to David Prins, Speech and Hearing Sciences, Eagleson Hall, JG-15, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1990
Acoustical Durations of Speech Segments During Stuttering Adaptation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 494-504. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.494
History: Received August 28, 1989 , Accepted March 2, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 494-504. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.494
History: Received August 28, 1989; Accepted March 2, 1990

Acoustical durations of stutter- and disfluency-free speech segments from Readings #1 and #5 in an adaptation series were measured in 4 adapting, 4 nonadapting, and 4 nonstuttering subjects. The segment durations measured were intervocalic interval, stop-gap, voice onset time, and vowel duration. No clear trends in the change of acoustical durations from Reading #1 to Reading #5 distinguished the adapting, nonadapting, or nonstuttering subjects. Moreover, on the basis of speech naturalness judgments, listeners did not differentiate the Reading #1 and #5 phrase segments of subjects with high adaptation versus those with low adaptation scores. From these findings and related literature, adaptation of stuttering, as well as other fluency-inducing conditions, are viewed as circumstances that reduce demands upon central motor-linguistic processes.

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