Acoustic Dimensions of Hearing-Impaired Speakers’ Intelligibility Segmental and Suprasegmental Characteristics Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1990
Acoustic Dimensions of Hearing-Impaired Speakers’ Intelligibility
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dale Evan Metz
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology, NY
  • Vincent J. Samar
    National Technical Institute for the Deaf at Rochester Institute of Technology, NY
  • Nicholas Schiavetti
    State University of New York, College at Geneseo, NY
  • Ronald W. Sitler
    State University of New York, College at Geneseo, NY
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to Dale E. Metz, Ph.D., Dept. of Communication Research, NTID at Rochester Institute of Technology, One Lomb Memorial Drive, Rochester, NY 14623.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1990
Acoustic Dimensions of Hearing-Impaired Speakers’ Intelligibility
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 476-487. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.476
History: Received February 27, 1989 , Accepted February 23, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 476-487. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.476
History: Received February 27, 1989; Accepted February 23, 1990

Regression and principal components analyses were employed to study the relationship between 28 segmental and suprasegmental acoustic parameters of speech production and measures of speech intelligibility for 40 severely to profoundly hearing-impaired persons in an effort to extend the findings of Metz, Samar, Schiavetti, Sitler, and Whitehead (1985). The principal components analysis derived six factors that accounted for 59% of the variance in the original 28 parameters. Consistent with the findings of Metz et al., a subsequent regression analysis using these six factors as predictor variables revealed two factors with strong predictive relationships to speech intelligibility. One factor primarily reflected segmental production processes related to the temporal and spatial differentiation of phonemes, whereas the other primarily reflected suprasegmental production processes associated with contrastive stress. However, the predictive capability of the present factor structure was somewhat reduced relative to the findings of Metz et al. (1985). Data presented indicate that the populations sampled in the two studies may have differed on one or more dimensions of subject characteristics. Considered collectively, the present findings and the findings of Metz et al. support the tractability of employing selected acoustic variables for the estimation of speech intelligibility.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was conducted in the course of an agreement between the National Technical Institute for the Deaf at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the United States Department of Education. The authors thank George Silver, Jr., for his assistance with data analysis.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access