Speech Production Time and Judgments of Disordered Nasalization in Speakers with Cleft Palate The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of production time on the perception of disordered nasalization in children with cleft palate. The subjects with cleft palate included 5 who produced acceptable speech consistently, 5 who produced disordered nasalization consistently, and 10 who were inconsistent in the production ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1990
Speech Production Time and Judgments of Disordered Nasalization in Speakers with Cleft Palate
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David L. Jones
    Department of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery University of Iowa
  • John W. Folkins
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology University of Iowa
  • Hughlett L. Morris
    Department of Otolarnygology—Head and Neck Surgery University of Iowa
  • Requests for reprints should be sent to David L. Jones, Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Division of Speech and Hearing, Riley Hospital, Suite A-56, 702 Barnhill Dr., Indianapolis, IN 46202-5230.
Article Information
Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1990
Speech Production Time and Judgments of Disordered Nasalization in Speakers with Cleft Palate
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 458-466. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.458
History: Received July 17, 1989 , Accepted February 2, 1990
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1990, Vol. 33, 458-466. doi:10.1044/jshr.3303.458
History: Received July 17, 1989; Accepted February 2, 1990

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of production time on the perception of disordered nasalization in children with cleft palate. The subjects with cleft palate included 5 who produced acceptable speech consistently, 5 who produced disordered nasalization consistently, and 10 who were inconsistent in the production of disordered nasalization. We examined a range of production times similar to those for the production of single-word and connected speech tasks. Ten judges used direct magnitude estimation to rate severity of disordered nasalization. An accelerometric ratio technique was used to estimate the extent and timing of nasal acoustic activity. The results showed that reducing the production time did not change perceptible nasalization.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This research was supported by Public Health Service Grants DE-05837 from the National Institute of Dental Research and CD-00085 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The authors wish to thank Jerry Moon for his assistance with the graphics.
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